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Under Armour Debuts New Training Line With Infrared Technology

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New UA Rush technology provides infrared energy return infused into fabric.

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CREDIT: Under Armour.

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The body is like a light bulb, emitting 110 to 120 watts of energy in the form of heat. Under Armour wants to harness that heat and turn it into a benefit during training by debuting on April 11 the new UA Rush training line embedded with infrared technology, a technology that pushes energy back to the body and improves oxygen flow and circulation, recycling the body’s energy.

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“We are creating a new category of performance apparel,” says Dan Leraris, Under Armour general manager for men’s training and boys. “People aren’t looking for their apparel to do something for them, they want something they can do something in. We are providing something that can do something for you, a responsive textile.”

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Under Armour partnered with Tom Brady in 2017 to launch a recovery garment with printed infrared patterns inside pajamas. With Leraris saying the science backs the benefits of infrared, Under Armour expand the technology beyond a printed recovery garment, spending two years working to build a new baselayer product to improve active performance.

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UA Rush launches with baselayer options.

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CREDIT: Under Armour.

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Partnering with Celliant, the only company with FDA approval as an infrared wellness device, Under Armour has taken the Celliant propriety mix and formula of natural earth minerals that creates an infrared compound when activated by body heat and embedded it directly into the yarn. Protected by a sheath within the yarn, Leraris says wearers won’t feel the minerals against the skin and won’t lose its benefits when the garment gets washed or stretched.

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“That is the start of responsive texctiles,” he says. For the technology to activate it simply needs to be within two inches of the skin, but doesn’t have to directly touch it, allowing Under Armour flexibility in the future in the type of garments it creates.

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The naturally occurring technology improves oxygen flow and circulation near the skin so a wearer can train harder and longer. “Will you run better that first day you put it on? Probably not,” Leraris says. “Will you improve over time? Yes.”

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UA Rush product will carry with it a special mark to distinguish the technology.

.
CREDIT: Under Armour.

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Under Armour has already spread its Rush products to sponsored professional athletes and collegiate partners (Notre Dame football wore it all fall, for example), but releases it to the public this April, launching in classic baselayer products of compression leggings and shorts, compression short-sleeve and long-sleeve tops and fitted short-sleeve and long-sleeve tops. “We are building Under Armour’s core product offering with super powers,” Leraris says. “It is very much your core fundamental training product across any sport, any movement.”

.

Adding the Celliant infrared technology into the yarn hasn’t impacted breathability, stretch or durability of the garment, Leraris says. With the time spent on developing this particular fabric — a Rush hexagon icon will distinguish the product — Under Armour wants to first create awareness within the brand’s popular baselayer systems before working to develop new fabrics embedded with Rush for other styles.

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UA Rush product.

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CREDIT: Under Armour.

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At launch, Under Armour plans to sell Rush at key retailers and at UA Brand Houses and on its website, all with a global distribution. With about a 40 to 50 percent premium compared to a typical baselayer, Rush product will range between $45 to $100, depending on the style.

.

“We want to be able to get it on more people and we stuck and research and development costs with us,” Leraris says. “We want to get it on athletes’ bodies. This is not some limited edition, this is a wellness device.”

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.

Brand-new UA Rush technology provides infrared energy return infused into fabric.

CREDIT: Under Armour

The body is like a light bulb, producing 110 to 120 watts of energy in the form of heat. Under Armour desires to harness that heat and turn it into an advantage throughout training by debuting on April 11 the brand-new UA Rush training line embedded with infrared innovation, an innovation that pushes energy back to the body and enhances oxygen flow and blood circulation, recycling the body’s energy.

” We are creating a new classification of efficiency apparel,” states Dan Leraris, Under Armour basic manager for males’s training and kids. “People aren’t trying to find their clothing to do something for them, they desire something they can do something in. We are providing something that can do something for you, a responsive fabric.”

Under Armour partnered with Tom Brady in 2017 to release a recovery garment with printed infrared patterns inside pajamas. With Leraris stating the science backs the benefits of infrared, Under Armour expand the technology beyond a printed healing garment, spending two years working to develop a new baselayer product to enhance active performance.

.

UA Rush launches with
baselayer options.

CREDIT: Under Armour

.

.

Partnering with Celliant, the only company with FDA approval as an infrared health device, Under Armour has actually taken the Celliant propriety mix and formula of natural earth minerals that develops an infrared substance when triggered by body heat and embedded it straight into the yarn. Secured by a sheath within the yarn, Leraris says wearers will not feel the minerals against the skin and won’t lose its advantages when the garment gets cleaned or stretched.

.

” That is the start of responsive texctiles,” he states. For the innovation to activate it just requires to be within two inches of the skin, however doesn’t need to straight touch it, allowing Under Armour versatility in the future in the kind of garments it develops.

The naturally happening innovation enhances oxygen flow and flow near the skin so a wearer can train more difficult and longer. “Will you run better that initially day you put it on? Most likely not,” Leraris states. “Will you improve with time? Yes.”

.

UA Rush item will bring with it a special mark to identify the innovation.

CREDIT: Under Armour

Under Armour has already spread its Rush items to sponsored professional athletes and collegiate partners (Notre Dame football used it all fall, for instance), but releases it to the general public this April, launching in classic baselayer products of compression leggings and shorts, compression short-sleeve and long-sleeve tops and fitted short-sleeve and long-sleeve tops. “We are constructing Under Armour’s core item offering with very powers,” Leraris states. “It is very much your core basic training item throughout any sport, any motion.”

Adding the Celliant infrared innovation into the yarn hasn’t impacted breathability, stretch or durability of the garment, Leraris says. With the time invested in developing this particular material– a Rush hexagon icon will distinguish the item– Under Armour wants to very first develop awareness within the brand name’s popular baselayer systems before working to establish brand-new fabrics embedded with Rush for other designs.

UA Rush item.

CREDIT: Under Armour .

.

.

At launch, Under Armour prepares to sell Rush at crucial merchants and at UA Brand Houses and on its site, all with an international circulation. With about a 40 to 50 percent premium compared to a normal baselayer, Rush product will range between $45 to $100, depending upon the design.

” We wish to have the ability to get it on more individuals and we stuck and research and advancement costs with us,” Leraris states. “We wish to get it on athletes’ bodies. This is not some minimal edition, this is a health device.”

” >

New UA Rush innovation supplies infrared energy return infused into fabric.

CREDIT: Under Armour

.

.

The body resembles a light bulb, emitting 110 to 120 watts of energy in the kind of heat. Under Armour wishes to harness that heat and turn it into an advantage throughout training by debuting on April 11 the new UA Rush training line embedded with infrared technology, an innovation that presses energy back to the body and enhances oxygen circulation and blood circulation, recycling the body’s energy.

“We are producing a new classification of performance clothing,” says Dan Leraris, Under Armour basic supervisor for guys’s training and young boys. “Individuals aren’t searching for their clothing to do something for them, they want something they can do something in. We are offering something that can do something for you, a responsive fabric.”

Under Armour partnered with Tom Brady in 2017 to release a recovery garment with printed infrared patterns inside pajamas. With Leraris stating the science backs the benefits of infrared, Under Armour broaden the technology beyond a printed recovery garment, spending 2 years working to build a new baselayer item to enhance active efficiency.

.

.

UA Rush launches with baselayer choices.

CREDIT: Under Armour

.

.

Partnering with Celliant, the only business with FDA approval as an infrared wellness device, Under Armour has actually taken the Celliant propriety mix and formula of natural earth minerals that creates an infrared substance when triggered by temperature and embedded it directly into the yarn. Protected by a sheath within the yarn, Leraris states users will not feel the minerals against the skin and won’t lose its benefits when the garment gets washed or extended.

“That is the start of responsive texctiles,” he states. For the technology to activate it simply requires to be within two inches of the skin, but does not need to directly touch it, permitting Under Armour flexibility in the future in the kind of garments it produces.

The naturally occurring innovation improves oxygen circulation and flow near the skin so a wearer can train more difficult and longer. “Will you run better that first day you put it on? Most likely not,” Leraris states. “Will you enhance gradually? Yes.”

.

.

UA Rush product will carry with it a special mark to identify the technology.

CREDIT: Under Armour

.

.

Under Armour has already spread its Rush products to sponsored professional athletes and collegiate partners (Notre Dame football wore all of it fall, for instance), however launches it to the public this April, releasing in classic baselayer products of compression leggings and shorts, compression short-sleeve and long-sleeve tops and fitted short-sleeve and long-sleeve tops. “We are developing Under Armour’s core item offering with super powers,” Leraris states. “It is really much your core fundamental training product throughout any sport, any movement.”

Including the Celliant infrared technology into the yarn hasn’t impacted breathability, stretch or durability of the garment, Leraris says. With the time spent on establishing this specific fabric– a Rush hexagon icon will identify the item– Under Armour wishes to very first produce awareness within the brand name’s popular baselayer systems prior to working to develop brand-new fabrics embedded with Rush for other designs.

.

.

UA Rush item.

CREDIT: Under Armour

.

.

At launch, Under Armour plans to offer Rush at key merchants and at UA Brand Name Houses and on its website, all with a worldwide distribution. With about a 40 to 50 percent premium compared to a typical baselayer, Rush item will vary in between $ 45 to $ 100, depending on the style.

“We wish to have the ability to get it on more people and we stuck and research and advancement costs with us,” Leraris says. “We wish to get it on professional athletes’ bodies. This is not some restricted edition, this is a health gadget.”

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About Ronnie

Ronald Antonio O'Sullivan OBE (born 5 December 1975) is an English professional snooker player who is widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the sport. He has won five World Championships, a record seven Masters titles, and a record seven UK Championships, setting a record total of 19 titles in Triple Crown tournaments. He shares the record for the most ranking titles (36) with Stephen Hendry. His career earnings of over £10 million put him in first place on snooker's all-time prize-money list. Winning the Tour Championship on 24 March 2019 made him the sport's current world number one, the fourth time in his career that he has held the top position and the first time he has been number one since May 2010. This is the longest gap between number one spells by any player in history.